News & Events

History Now: Galveston and the COVID-19 Pandemic

En españolHistory begins with you! Our grandchildren and great-grandchildren will one day ask how we responded to the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic. They will look for letters, diaries, photographs, posters, and other items that shed light on how the pandemic affected our lives. The Rosenberg Library’s Special Collections Department welcomes Galvestonians to contribute to the historical record today.Questions? Email us at…
Read More >

The Great Galveston Fire of 1885: November 13, 1885

Most Galvestonians are familiar with the 1900 Storm and other devastating hurricanes which have struck the island over the years. Another catastrophic disaster you may not know about is the Great Fire of 1885 which burned hundreds of homes across 40 city blocks, displacing thousands of residents.This November marks the 135th Anniversary of this catastrophic event. This week, Rosenberg Library's…
Read More >

Hiding In Plain Sight: The Galveston Tribune, Saturday, September 8, 1900

By Casey Edward Greene, Rosenberg ScholarRosenberg Library staff recently made a remarkable discovery: an issue of the Galveston Tribune printed on Saturday, September 8, 1900, the day of the 1900 Storm. This issue is among thousands of Tribune issues which belong to Rosenberg Library and are being digitized and uploaded by the Portal to Texas History at the University of…
Read More >

The Ill-Fated Maiden Voyage of the Texas

By Kevin Kinney, Rosenberg Library ArchivistRosenberg Library’s Galveston and Texas History Center has the log book to the steam dredger Texas of New York, captained by James Alexander Minot of Galveston. Built at a cost of $250,000, the ship was to have been employed in the grade raising of Galveston Island, an effort to protect the island from catastrophic flooding…
Read More >

Recalling Galveston’s Theatorium and Colonial Theater

By Casey Edward Greene, Rosenberg ScholarThe 19th century saw the evolution of two popular forms of entertainment. The first form of entertainment was vaudeville, whose heyday ran from the 1850s to the 1930s. Vaudeville offered something for everyone. Comparable to the modern televised variety show, it offered a smorgasbord of entertainment. Performances included comedy, singing, dancing, juggling, ventriloquism, and other…
Read More >

Those Who Fell: Part 3 of Profiles of Selected 1900 Storm Victims

By Casey Edward GreenePart 3 examines more Galveston and Galveston Island victims. The profiles include discussion of archival sources and their limitations. Victim lists often contain incorrect, incomplete, and contradictory information, making any effort to identify hurricane casualties a major undertaking.Parts 1 and 2 of this series can be viewed at the following links: Those Who Fell: Part 1 of…
Read More >

Crystal Palace Bathhouse

By Casey Edward Greene, Rosenberg ScholarOn January 18, 1916, Galveston voters rejected Charter Amendment “O,” one of a series of fifteen local charter amendments, by a margin of 1,762 voters to 1,238. The Bathhouse Charter Amendment proposed “that no structures of floating materials shall be constructed or maintained outside of the seawall or extension thereof.” “Floating materials” was an oblique term for “wood.”
Read More >

Galveston’s First “Big Circus…in Years”

Galveston’s Rotary Club sponsored two appearances by Ray Bros. Circus in the mid-1940s. The first performance took place at City Auditorium. February 15-19, 1944. An advertisement in the Galveston Daily News, February 13, 1944, billed the event as “The Colossus of Indoor Shows” and “The Only Big Circus to Show in Galveston in Years.”
Read More >

Juneteenth Celebrations Past and Present

By Kevin KinneyThis article was originally published in the Galveston County Daily News on June 17, 2020: https://www.galvnews.com/lifes...
Read More >

Handling the Multitudes: Traffic Control on Seawall Boulevard, 1911-1949

By Casey Edward GreeneSince the early twentieth century, the Seawall and Seawall Boulevard have defined Galveston’s beachfront. Each tourist season, multitudes trek to Galveston for beaches and Gulf bathing. They come mostly in cars, creating a constant challenge for authorities to ensure orderly traffic flow without endangering pedestrians. During earlier decades, city commissioners implemented a variety of methods, which drew…
Read More >

Online Workshop: Searching the Galveston Tribune Newspaper

Watch a recording of the workshop below:___Join the Galveston & Texas History Center in exploring the 1900 Storm, the construction of the Seawall, or even your family’s history through this vital newspaper with the University of North Texas’ Portal to Texas History, one of the many valuable research databases available at the Rosenberg Library.May 16, 2020 from 11 am –…
Read More >